Page 1 2 3 
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Did you ever eat a Smit?
 Login/Join 
posted Hide Post
I ate smits on a number of occasions. The thing to do with a smit is wash it down with a gazos (looked like 7-up but tasted like buble gum.) This is a Turkish tase sensation everyone should have experienced at least once.
One of my favorite restaurant dishes was doner kebab (meat, possibly goat, or ?, cooked on a rotating spit similar to the Greek gyro.) It was served with ekmek, of course. A good side dish was dolma (green pepper stuffed with rice and ground meat and lots of spices.) Delicious!
After 7.5 years in Turkey, and a number of cases of the TTs, I finally became immune to them, even drank the water (but only in emergencies.)
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: October 04, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
I don't remember if I ever ate a smit. After four and half years in Turkey, must have. Probably called by another name? I sure do miss doner kebab. Haven't had any since Turkey. It seems like every city wants to name their own "kebab". When I was stationed at Incirlik AB outside of Adana, - that's right, they had "Adana Kebab". Sort of a wrap with meat and vegetables.
 
Posts: 15 | Location: Atlanta,GA | Registered: September 14, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Actually, it should probably be spelled "semit" (with an e). They looked like large pretzels and the street vendors carried them around very creatively - even stacked very precariously on a tray on their heads. They would call out "semit, semit, semit, semit". They were actually not bad ... a departure from the unsalted popcorn available from other vendors. If one of those semit vendors had ever tripped, it would have created much chaos and possible anarchy.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: October 04, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Oh yes, then I've had a semit. Not a whole lot of them. Didn't want to press my luck. Now I really got into those roasted, salted pistachio nuts from the street vendors. And ekmek!
 
Posts: 15 | Location: Atlanta,GA | Registered: September 14, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Did anyone ever eat the freshly baked cookies from the bakery behind the old high school? I remember slipping over there between classes and getting them fresh and hot. Sorta like a hard butter cookie. Never have found anything like it. Also the "Turkish delight" candy - kinda like gummy squares. I remember getting them from a Turkish family in our neighborhood (Gazi Osman Pasa) one Halloween when we went trick or treating. (Yes, I was a little old for that, but I had 2 younger sisters as my cover!)
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: January 25, 2005Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Dear fellow voyagers - just a few comments. Actually the correct spelling is "simit" - in most Turkish nouns the vowels stay the same. The "e" would not go with the dotted "i". Doner Kebab (umlaut over the "o") is indeed a delicacy and is, essentially, the same thing as gyros. The words mean "turning roast" - pretty descriptive, eh? I wonder whether it would still be as good? The meat used in doner kebab is a combination of beef and lamb, with appropriate spices added. Apparently the place in Ankara for doner kebab was Haci Bey's - though I never personally ate there - there's another thread in here somewhere where people have mentioned it. Turkish delight can be obtained in many Arab groceries in American cities - it usually goes under the name Raha - or something like it. Sometimes it has pistachios in it, sometimes not.
As for the sanitary condition of simit - the only thing you could do was to decide that if you didn't see it hit the ground then it never happened. Similar to the old 3 second rule.
 
Posts: 21 | Registered: September 02, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Brad, I agree with that 3 second rule! Actually, after having been there for 3 separate tours of duty, and never getting sick from anything I ate, I believe my immune system is pretty strong. I attribute it to the simits, and all the little holes in the walls I use to eat in (like Haci Beys!)


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Why were you there for three tours of duty, Alice? I'm envious!
 
Posts: 33 | Registered: September 13, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
The first time was just like everyone else....luck of the draw. The second time dad put in for it as a first choice for overseas duty, and the third time, he traded. A friend was being stationed in Ankara, but he wanted to retire in Germany in the area we were in (Dad was stationed to Spangdahlem Air Base). Dad wanted to go back to Turkey. So, they put in for a switch, showing how it would save the government money by sending the friend for his last tour of duty to Germany. Being lucky was how we got there that many times. Yes, obviously we loved it! I had a friend who went on tour a few years ago with her church, and she was real apprehensive. Everyone involved with the tour kept telling them it was dangerous to go off alone, and to keep within the group, etc. (much like being told the simits were poison!) I told her that wasn't the country I remembered. Anyway, she had a great time, snuck away from the tour several times to go shopping and look at other sights. She said she never felt threatened.


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Good for your friend. Were you in Ankara all three times? My dad was stationed in Izmir for 3 years when I was 10, and I was really excited about returning when I went to Ankara as a senion (my parents were in Jordan). I loved it there and would love to live there again for about a year. My husband and I travelled there a few years ago and enjoyed it thoroughly. When were you there last?
 
Posts: 33 | Registered: September 13, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
We lived in Ankara all three times. The first neighborhood was in Maltepe (on Gulserin Sok) '64-'67, then in Mebus, I temporarily forget the street, but it was a single family home '68-'70 (and the last 4 or 5 months we moved back to the same bldg in Maltepe), and then from '73-'77 we lived in Cankaya on Pilot Sok. I would love to go back sometime!


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
I couldn't believe the traffic in Ankara in '94, or the building that had occurred since I saw it in '66. There's no end of buildings from downtown to way out beyond Balgat. If we hadn't had someone driving us who knew where he was going, I'd have never recognized the area where the school was. The trees have grown to such a height that you can't tell that there's a large depression where the elementary school sat below the high school and the dorms. There was a multi-level mall on the main street in Ankara (I don't remember the names of anything)that looked like a Galleria-type mall here, with a lot of the same stores. We walked into the mall looking for a camera shop, and there was a group of Turkish teenagers standing in the entrance, all wearing Levis and Nikes or Reeboks. It was all I could do not to laugh out loud.We went to the Museum of Anatolian Cultures (or Civilizations) and it was fascinating. I'd seen it years before, and it's got so much more now.It's still in sore need of labels and descriptive text, but it is still one of the neatest museums I've been in. I hope you have a chance some time to go back.
 
Posts: 33 | Registered: September 13, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Ken Fitzhugh '69:
I ate smits on a number of occasions. The thing to do with a smit is wash it down with a gazos (looked like 7-up but tasted like buble gum.) This is a Turkish tase sensation everyone should have experienced at least once.
One of my favorite restaurant dishes was doner kebab (meat, possibly goat, or ?, cooked on a rotating spit similar to the Greek gyro.) It was served with ekmek, of course. A good side dish was dolma (green pepper stuffed with rice and ground meat and lots of spices.) Delicious!
After 7.5 years in Turkey, and a number of cases of the TTs, I finally became immune to them, even drank the water (but only in emergencies.)
Gazos!! Wow I found something close in California, Rasberry flavored mineral water. It took me back. Turkish 7UP Yedi Gun (goon) tasted like they used lemon colgne in it. Simits were great toasted.
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Man, you are die-hards if you ate simits from a street vendor. The dirty hands rummaging through the plate then rubbing their nose...ughh!

But, speaking of street vendor singing...how about cilik, cilik, cilik! for the strawberry vendor? And the taste of tarcun ci?
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: August 23, 2005Reply With Quote
posted Hide Post
Yes, I ate smits!!! Lots of smits!!!! And if I didn't see them on the street, or see the kids wiping their noses with their hands, then I could convince my sub-conscious (msp??)that it never happened!! Never got sick from it either. Other things I remember from the vendors: chick peas, cotton candy, candy apples, roasted corn, ice cream (the dondurma stands, yum!), nougat candies (which I do not remember what they were called), and I am sure that there was more. I always ate from the vendors. Also, I remember my mom buying yogurt from the guy who sold yogurt, eggs, butter and I do believe milk from his horses wagon. Sometimes she even got eggs from him. AND last but not least, our water was delivered from a horse and cart, until we moved to Germany and then back to Turkey. Then it came on a big truck. But, in Mebus, on Ayten Sok. it was delivered on a wagon, and we use to feed the horse carrots, apples and sugar cubes. Very Nice!


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2 3