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I was just in elementary school, but I remember the dorms, and later they were to become the barracks for the young GI's. Also, the theater would eventually end up where the lunchroom was for the elementary school, which also became the headquarters building. After all that work to make the base bigger (I ended up at the carbarn building for my third grade year, since there was not enough room at the elementary school)they had that large downsizing around the early 70's. I spent so much time at bases overseas (mostly Ankara) from 1968 until 1977, that when I came back to the States, it was really an odd feeling not having the National Anthem being played before a movie. And the prices also just floored me!


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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The movie theater was close to the Merhaba Palas in the 60s. I, too, saw 2001 A Space Odyssey there. Of course, close is relative since we walked everywhere back then!

I remember the Saturday matinees there. I always looked forward to the "before the show" shows, like Zorro.

By the 70s they had moved the theater to JUSMAT. It wasn't quite the same.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: January 05, 2005Reply With Quote
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Yeah, it was after they were at Jusmat they were moved to the headquarters building on the base. That was sometime in the mid-seventies. Seems like they couldn't make up their minds. I remember seeing Jaws there. After graduating I got a job as a temporary GS-3 for the Civil Engineers, and had to attend a meeting in the "multi-purpose" room, as it was referred to by day. I thought they should have just put on a movie and then it wouldn't have been such a dull meeting! I think having it on the base made it more accessible for the young airmen in the barracks to utilize.


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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This looks like a live thread, so I'll jump in. Kurt, I don't specifically remember you - I remember your brother Karl. You guys were leaving about the time we arrived. I think you lived in the same building with the Carusos - the guy my dad took over from as Commissary Officer. Didn't you guys go to Lakenheath? I remember running into Karl once in England - we ended up at Alconbury.
I thought Turkey was terrific! I haven't had the chance to go back but would dearly love to. Anybody else hang out at the Karasel night club downtown? I can remember pouring myself into a cab after a wild evening there now and then. We would go down mainly when Kachina was playing. Don't remember all the members but Mark Davies played drums and Pat Hutton played keyboards. It's a pity more of the 69-70 folk don't visit this site more often. It was quite an eventful year!
How about Kara Bira? Anyone remember that? It was tolerable when it was ice cold - pretty potent stuff I recall. Just before we left Turkey they started marketing Tuborg beer - before that it was just the government stuff.
 
Posts: 21 | Registered: September 02, 2004Reply With Quote
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I'm sorry what did you say?
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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OK Brad The Carusos lived in the building next door. We never went to England. The guy you met was a soviet spy trying to get to your Dad through you, so they could learn the secrets of American food Like Poptarts and Jello. You know the nuclear stuff. Kachina some of them were Canadians.
The drink in Ankara was Kanyak=brandy. Or Dikmen or the $.80 a bottle champagne Kavak.
I will go back, but to Izmir it's prettier.
quote:
Originally posted by Brad Buchner '70:
This looks like a live thread, so I'll jump in. Kurt, I don't specifically remember you - I remember your brother Karl. You guys were leaving about the time we arrived. I think you lived in the same building with the Carusos - the guy my dad took over from as Commissary Officer. Didn't you guys go to Lakenheath? I remember running into Karl once in England - we ended up at Alconbury.
I thought Turkey was terrific! I haven't had the chance to go back but would dearly love to. Anybody else hang out at the Karasel night club downtown? I can remember pouring myself into a cab after a wild evening there now and then. We would go down mainly when Kachina was playing. Don't remember all the members but Mark Davies played drums and Pat Hutton played keyboards. It's a pity more of the 69-70 folk don't visit this site more often. It was quite an eventful year!
How about Kara Bira? Anyone remember that? It was tolerable when it was ice cold - pretty potent stuff I recall. Just before we left Turkey they started marketing Tuborg beer - before that it was just the government stuff.
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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Brad, the beer in the 70's was Tuborg. They had both a light and a dark. The dark was pretty strong, (and being a lightweight) I preferred the light. Do you remember the Samsun cigarettes? They were pretty potent! I am not sure what they were mixed with, but I bet they got it off a farm! I always laugh when I read on a pack of Camel's "Smooth Turkish Blend"! Fortunately, I have quit smoking since then.


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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The worst Turkish cigarette was oochinjee- Who knows how to spell it in Turkish? it means 3rd. There was also a 2nd and first. The 3rd was very crude cost 50 kurus in 1969. The pack was 20 cigs wrapped in very crude newsprint that had an ink stamp for a label. Our maid smoked them, I put up the extra money and got her some Firsts= Birinjee. She got mad cause she would have to go back to the thirds and they would taste like crap for a while.
Remember Raki the licorice flavored unleaded gas they had there. It would turn water cloudy white.
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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Kurt - yeah, must have been a spy - or maybe I just dreamed it! Ucuncu would be the spelling for the cheap cigarettes - with umlauts over the Us and cedillas under the Cs. They were indeed horrific, as were most of the other Turkish brands.
Alice - Tuborg was just coming in when we left - I didn't like it much - too bitter. I think the government brand was called Tekel or something like that. I didn't smoke the Turkish cigarettes much - at least not as such. We used to use the papers from them to conjure up other things - using other substances. 'Nuff said - probably took five years off my life!! I still get a kick out of the Camel slogan. I always figured they must have sold all their good tobacco to the US and used what they swept up off the floor for their own cigarettes. I know a carton of Marlboros fetched a terrific price on the black market!
The other "wonder" product I remember from Turkey was something called Tuz Ruhu - it was a cleanser that would take rust or mineral rings off pretty much anything. Of course after the 2nd or 3rd use it would also begin to dissolve the porcelain in your sink...
 
Posts: 21 | Registered: September 02, 2004Reply With Quote
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Thanx, I'm glad someone else remembered the subtle things of Turkey. Did you ever try ayrange=i ron je = it was like plain yogurt juice? When I first went to Ankara I had nothing to do with any of the yogurt or anything
like that. By the time we left in 70 I loved it.
Remember the sesame seed bread rings=smitay or whatever. The breifing they gave us when we first arrived was that all street venders were serving various forms of poison or disease. Thank God I'm still alive.
The wine was very good. Of course I was 14 and 15 what did I know. I mixed Kanyak with Pepsi.
Kurt
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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Kurt - I think it was just Ayran - don't know how it was spelled though. I never developed a taste for it - as for that, I still don't care that much for yogurt. Simit, on the other hand, was a favorite of mine. I remember the "briefing" about not eating them - but I ignored it and survived. Actually there's a thread in here somewhere about simit. I remember the konyak and the raki (the Arabs have the same stuff - call it Arak). Konyak and a friendly cab driver ended me up in Istanbul one weekend - raki just made me pass out. Didn't care much for the wine though. The guy behind the counter at the little store where I used to go for konyak, coke, and other stuff was a barrel-chested guy with a big laugh, who could pop the top off a soda with the edge of a butcher knife! Strange memories indeed!!
 
Posts: 21 | Registered: September 02, 2004Reply With Quote
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BB You missed out. Turkish yogurt and fresh turkish strawberries that did the trick.
I had one sip of water and Raki and I knew it would spell DANGER.
The restaraunt at the far end of Ulus was it called Haji Beys?? Donar Kebob was all they served. Did you ever go there? They had a weak sweet wine, it was served in like a 1 pint milk bottle. I need to go back and check it out.
K H8
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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Haci Beys......that is a memory. I remember sometimes having to wait almost a half hour to get a table! That was some good Kebab! I would bet it probably is still there, unless they tore out that section or improvements, like they do here in the States. Just a hole in the wall, but real popular. Raki, yeah, it was pretty good, but real potent. Only one night of throwing my guts out, and I was cured! I can see how a person could have ended up in Istanbul after a night of Raki. Yeah, Tuborg was kind of bitter, but the light was much less so than the dark. I didn't believe them about the street vendors. I use to eat smits all the time. I remember telling someone, if you didn't see it hit the ground, it never fell! There was also the corner ice cream (dondurma?) stands. Candied apples, candie (it was like a nougat, but I don' remember what it was called), and cotton candy. In the fall, they had people parked on the streets selling fresh roasted corn. And of course, sunflower seeds sold in newspaper cones. Salted or unsalted. Then there was the culture shock of coming back to the good old USA and not walking in the streets. I was informed that was what sidewalks were for. Go figure.........


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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ALICE, I WAS LUCKY, I NEVER HAD TO WAIT TO EAT THERE. BEST OF ALL I NEVER GOT SICK FROM IT.
THEN AGAIN AT ONE OF THE NICEST HOTELS IN ISTANBUL I GOT VERY ILL AND FOR ALOT MORE MONEY.
THAT REMINDS ME, WE, IN ENGLISH, COULD NEVER TELL A TURK WE WERE SICK. WE WOULD GET ILL.
OF COURSE IT WAS ALWAYS FUNNY WHEN TURKS SAID GOODBYE.
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Riverside,California | Registered: December 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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Oh, I nevr sick from Haci Beys. Raki made me ill after having to much. After that I couldn't even eat licorice for a long long time. (I am such a lightweight!) I had even forgotten the difference between sick and ill. Yeah, that would invoke a pretty different reaction.


Alice M. Chavez
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Denver, Colorado | Registered: November 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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