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When in Turkey this past May (2004), we chatted with a retired military gentleman (Turkish) that spent most of his time in Ankara at JUSMMAT. I asked him questions about Ankara. He said that where the new school was, as Judy stated, has been taken over by the Turkish Military, but in general that is now close to the center of the city. He stated that the city has grown down the valley (across the Hwy that Roger mentioned-now a freeway). On a positive note, he also stated that the government assisted in converting all heating to natural gas so that there is no longer coal being burned in the winter, thus assisting with the winter brown air that I so remember.

I lived out at Site 23, out past Lake Golbotchi (sp). Unfortunately, I didn't ask the gentleman about the area around the lake. Once past the lake, it was a dirt road out to Manzarali Station. Would have to ride the bus for the hours commute.


Mike Morrison
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: August 30, 2004Reply With Quote
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That was someone else who said the Turkish military took over the school. We had such a terrible time finding our way around in Ankara in 1999 we didn't even attempt to locate old schools.

However, Lake Golbasi is now a vacation destination with high rise hotels around it. http://www.adiyamanli.org/golbasi.htm

Mike, have you seen this web site? I think you actually might have sent it out a few years ago.
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Federal Way, WA | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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Posts: 28 | Location: Federal Way, WA | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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You guys are amazing. I can hardly remember what I had for breakfast yesterday! And you've got the names of the streets, the neighborhoods, and remember where things were. I have the foggiest memories - just remember I lived off the "Military Highway" (within bicycle distance) and lived on the second or 3rd floor of a building with very few Americans around. I lived with my parents, which listening to the stories of the dorm, probably was better than I thought it was at the time. I remember the slaughtering of a goat (was it Ramidam?) in the back yard. Never forgot that bloody mess. Took us a year to get a phone, and that was a BIG deal.

I'll have to ask my mother about where we lived - blocked it all out.
 
Posts: 9 | Registered: August 31, 2004Reply With Quote
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I might have sent it a number of years ago, it looks familiar. I think I got it from Brian G. I lost all those links when my computer took a dump a number of years ago. I thought there were more photos of the Site on the web site, but didn't see but the one.


Mike Morrison
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: August 30, 2004Reply With Quote
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Hmmm...are we implying that Turkish construction methods were not, shall we say, top drawer?? I recall watching some workers tearing down an apartment building - it was rather scary how easy it was to dismantle it! We stayed at the Dedeman hotel when we arrived - it's still there and they have a website. Our apartment was at 50A Tunus Caddesi in Kavaklidere - about half a block from the bowling alley and a block and a half from the billets. Remember the dancing bears? How about the milk plant at Balgat - where they used coconut oil to replace the milk fat - definitely an acquired taste! You know there is a book about us - it's called Garrison Community by Charlotte Wolf. She's a sociologist who went there, I think in the mid/late 60s to gather her data.
 
Posts: 21 | Registered: September 02, 2004Reply With Quote
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This forum is great, but my mind is not. I remember Gazi Osman Pasha but can't recall if it was the street or district. By the way I do remember the party at Bruce's, two giant jugs filled with Kool Aid, vodka, vodka and various other components. All else is a little vague.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: October 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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This is my first appearance here and I am a little uncertain how to proceed. The answer to your question, I lived in a five story appartment on Guniz Sokak, about a block down from the hospital. Jim Wintermeyer originally live a few blocks to the west and Mona Sedky, the first love in my life, lived across the adjacent field, to the south-west, directly across from the apartment structure which was the AF barracks. We were a fairly short walk from the original Teen Club on Ataturk Blvd. and from the dormitory building where it was subsequently moved. It was probably about a 10 minute walk to the Special Services building housing the theater/church, serman's club, library, etc. The general region was called Kavaklidari, entered off of Ataturk Blvd. into a bit of a circle. There was a winery located there across from the tennis club and there were many nights walking home or walking my dog Fritz that passed this place and its wonderful aromas. Steve Hatt, '63
 
Posts: 13 | Location: St. Augustine, FL | Registered: September 16, 2004Reply With Quote
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This is my first appearance also. I lived in Gazi Osman Pasha also - it is or was a district. Our street was Halichi (sp?) Sokak. We lived in a three story building with each floor being a two bedroom appartment. Our family lived in the two top appartments and the Turkish owner and his family lived in the bottom one. I remember the "Big Reds" going up and down the hill. Our home was on the corner of the street and the one (I forget that went up from Kavaklidar. There was a taxi button on the pole across the street that I would push and then wait for the taxi to glide down the hill with no lights/engine running, and then pay an ichi pachuk (sp?) (2.5 lira) to drive me anywhere in Ankara. Other times I rode my skate board down the hill and tried to avoid angry taxi drivers and donkey dung. I loved getting around on my own! I also loved throwing huge snow balls off my balcony onto the flat big front windows of the Big Reds in winter! They exploded and sounded like the widow blew out - but no harm was actually done. I cut it out when a bus driver stopped and he and several angry looking Turkish men searched all over the neighborhood looking for me. I also remember the smog - brown and dirty and stinky. Every year it climbed higher up the hill until we too were in its dark mess. I remember riding the Blue Air Force bus to and from school and sneaking a smoke even when the bus monitors where trying to catch us (we could always toss it out the window before getting caught). I also remember seeing the police stand in the middle of the intersection being overturned almost every day by some taxi or dolmus crashing into it. I have enjoyed reading the previous posts and remembering this myself. Its fun.
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Alachua, FL | Registered: October 07, 2004Reply With Quote
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I lived in Emek, 72 street.I would ride my bike around after school or play soccer with the neighbor kids.My main goal was surviving 11th grade and keeping my parents happy.In the summer i worked at the commessary. Last year, when i went back, Balgat village was gone. it is all part of the extended Ankara metro now.
dmagrath
 
Posts: 19 | Location: Daytona. FL | Registered: September 09, 2004Reply With Quote
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I lived in Gazi Osman Pasha, too, on Nene Hatun Caddesi, near the top of the hill. Chuck Cannon lived across the street from me. I practically lived in taxis but I don't think I ever paid a fare as low as 2 1/2 lire--as I recall 5 was more the going rate, sometimes 10 for multiple stops. I was in Ankara in 1999 and found Gazi totally changed. It is now a upscale neighborhood with lots of attractive apartment buildings. Gone are the two level houses like the one I lived in.

Bob Onisko: I'm sure you remember more. You just need a prode here or there.
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Federal Way, WA | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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okay, my turn: I lived on Sehit Ersan Caddesi, which was in the section of town called Cankaya--pretty far up the hill. It was an apartment building across from a little park. We had a gorgeous view, out our living room windows, of the city and the mountains beyond, until more and more buildings were built between us and the view.. We were just down the hill from the British Embassy, and up the hill from the President's house. Once my little brother took a short cut through the president's yard and there were some rather angry security people who chased him out. I also remember that every taxi seemed to cost "iki bochuk" (sp for everything Turkish I've tried to spell). Someone mentioned bus monitors on the school bus--we must not have had them when I was there (64-67), because one time I remember when we were on our way to school (a pretty long drive anyway), all the kids on the bus started encouraging the (Turkish) bus driver to not take us to school--he drove all around I think it was Bacchilidere, round and round--the bus driver was very young, and he was laughing and we were all laughing and yelling encouragement to him--eventually we got to school I guess, but we were pretty late. Probably that poor guy was fired after that....
 
Posts: 29 | Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan | Registered: August 31, 2004Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Judy Scholes '64:
I lived in Gazi Osman Pasha, too, on Nene Hatun Caddesi, near the top of the hill. Chuck Cannon lived across the street from me. I practically lived in taxis but I don't think I ever paid a fare as low as 2 1/2 lire--as I recall 5 was more the going rate, sometimes 10 for multiple stops. I was in Ankara in 1999 and found Gazi totally changed. It is now a upscale neighborhood with lots of attractive apartment buildings. Gone are the two level houses like the one I lived in.

Bob Onisko: I'm sure you remember more. You just need a prode here or there.


It seems to be working. I remember a CYO trip to Silifike, certain incidents and false accusations regarding shaving lotion. Plea's to get down off a castle wall and a dawn swim out to the island castle. I also remember a trip up to the Black Sea, more early morning swims and some great parties. Hopefully as I read more posts, my memory wil get better.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: October 04, 2004Reply With Quote
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Ah yes, the after shave lotion. Was it Aqua Velva? As I recall, you were thought to be drinking it. You know, I kept a log on that trip and came across it a few years later. For some unknown reason I felt it had to be destroyed and I regret that today. But the memories are good, too. I'll always associate Bacardi rum with you.
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Federal Way, WA | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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Oh my, such memories...Nene Hatun, Gazi Osman Pasha! Amazing how they came back to me when someone mentioned them. From reading these messages, it seems that things were located in different places at different times - so let me mention a few from 1969-70 and see who recalls. How about the Merhaba Palace - it was about a 20 minute walk uphill from where I lived in Kavaklidere - but I don't remember the street. There were a couple of apartments for incoming families and a sort of convenience store at street level. Then there was the annex in Maltepe. Any of you from 69-70 remember the Monday night dinners at the officers club in Cankaya? I think they were about once a month or so. How about the finger-sized bananas at the fruit stalls? For years no one would believe me about those - until they started showing up in grocery stores here. By the way - if I remember correctly - the spelling is iki bucuk, with a cedilla under the c.
 
Posts: 21 | Registered: September 02, 2004Reply With Quote
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