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Where Did You Live?
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<George Summers '57>
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How 'bout we start a new thread? Where did you live in Ankara? We started off in Meibus (sp) and then moved to Bachi (sp). In the mid '50s Bachi was in walking distance to Ataturk's tomb, I guess it still is, but there was nothing but barren hillsides between Bachi and the tomb.

George
 
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George, and Sugar Creek. I arrived in 58 and we lived in Bachi. Very few families at that time and we felt isolated.
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: September 09, 2004Reply With Quote
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Rich, did you always live in Bachi? I thought I went to a party at Bruce's in Gazi?
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Federal Way, WA | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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We used to live about a block or two from the Theater/Teen Club, on Buklum Sokak. Kavaklader. (sp) (No spell check for that one) Lived in the same place the whole time in Turkey. 63-66


 
Posts: 61 | Location: Sacramento, CA | Registered: August 31, 2004Reply With Quote
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We lived in Star Apartments in Bahcelievler. 1966 to 1968. I noted one of the comments about water from the Billets. We treated ours with bleach. 8 drops per gallon and then it had to sit for 24 hours before use. That did wonders for the digestive system initially.


Roger Redwanski - Class of "68"
"Never argue with the person packing your parachute"
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Fieldsboro, NJ | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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Hey Roger! I lived there from 1964-66. The building we lived in was one of the newer ones. We looked out over the highway on the top floor. Used to watch the herds of sheep come down the highway. Do you remember the glassed-in rooms on the top of the building? And the elevators which might or might not be there when you opened the door and looked down twelve floors of elevator shaft? John & Skip Thomson lived in another building, as did Al Superzcinski(sp?). What an experience!
 
Posts: 27 | Registered: September 07, 2004Reply With Quote
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I was sooo lucky to be a dormie. we were allowed on hour in town on Saturday,at the PX. when the whole PX/commissary was moved to Balgat,as far as I can recall,we couldn't go during the week. we might as well have been in jail out there.when I heard the dorms had been closed,I celebrated. worse time there was in the winter.
 
Posts: 16 | Location: California | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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We were right nest to the highway. Building 8? I believe. They were constructing new ones when we left. I have photos of them on my web pages. I don't remember the glassed in rooms on top but then I failed to absorb quite a bit over there. There was a store under the lower floor that was like a convenience store.

Do you remember the boiler room between the buildings that had a flat roof and about a 10 foot drop to the back side. My brother and I were escaping an irate taxi driver one night and we jumped the fence and ran and I forgot there was that drop. Damn near killed me but we still outran the driver. That was between buildings 1 and 2. Well I had enough sense not to have him go directly to our building.

We had a transformer installed in the apartment to convert the power to 110. Just used the two pin adapters to plug in all the standards. My brother went next door with his new amplifier to jam with a Turkish friend. Shoulda seen that amp smoke. Wow.


Roger Redwanski - Class of "68"
"Never argue with the person packing your parachute"
 
Posts: 54 | Location: Fieldsboro, NJ | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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My husband and I visited Ankara in '94 and we went out to the school. It was, at that time, an international school, but still named G.C. Marshall High School. The entire complex was in the process of being turned over to the Turkish military. You could no longer see the elementary school in the "bowl" below the high school because of the trees. The dorms were barracks for the Turkish military, and they had added outside walkways around the second floor. There's a huge church looming over the whole complex from a hill near what was the PX. The thing that was the most remarkable, to me, other than the trees, was that when I was in school there in '65, there was very little development between the town and the school, and that whole area, and beyond, is now covered with buildings, with new development going up everywhere. There was a very western style mall downtown, with masses of Turkish teenagers standing around in Levis and Nikes (and shirts, of course). And Ankara had the worst traffic I've ever been in.

I was a dormie, too, and actually liked it. There were times when I felt "jailed" but that feeling occurred at home, occasionally, too.
 
Posts: 33 | Registered: September 13, 2004Reply With Quote
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Merri,

I have heard these kinds of stories from others who have ventured back to the fold, then I didn't know they had moved the AFEX out to Balgot. Since we left there in June of 66. I guess the Turks had to expand somewhere. All this time and that school is still going strong. I wonder, was that a Turkish construction company who built the school, or was it done by a Turkish Co.?


 
Posts: 61 | Location: Sacramento, CA | Registered: August 31, 2004Reply With Quote
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I don't know, Wray, but I suspect it was a US company with Turkish workers.
 
Posts: 33 | Registered: September 13, 2004Reply With Quote
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Merri--thanks for that description. wow. so is there any school still in Ankara, I wonder, with American kids? I just realized that it has been 40 years since my family went to Turkey. We lived on Sehit Ersan Cad, in Cankaya. Merri, your brother Bob was a friend of mine. I remember both you and Wray as being the "cool, older" kids!
 
Posts: 29 | Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan | Registered: August 31, 2004Reply With Quote
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I FIRST LIVED HALF-WAY UP CHUNKYA HILL IN GUVEN-EVELERI. I LATER LIVED ON TOP OF THE HILL DOWN THE BLOCK FROM THOSE TALL BRAND-NEW EMPTY APT BLDGS BY THE TAXI STAND, NEAR THE BIG HOLE IN THE GROUND. CAN'T REMEMBER THE STREET NAME?
 
Posts: 15 | Location: Atlanta,GA | Registered: September 14, 2004Reply With Quote
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We first lived on Besterkir(sp) socok then moved Kazerilamak(sp) Socak in Yeni Shire(sp). There were no groups of Americans in one place, we lived all over the place. A big blue militay bus would come and take us to school.
Thanks,
Patrick
 
Posts: 49 | Location: Prestonsburg, KY | Registered: September 14, 2004Reply With Quote
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I know the an answer to the question about who built the schools. I happen to work with a guy who is retired Army Corps of Engineers. We have a real bond because he was stationed in Adada in the 1980's (he's my age) and while there he rebuilt the high school in Ankara. And I also know class of 1963 Wayne Taylor's dad was in charge of building the elementary school. What I don't know is if Turkish labor was employed but I would imagine it was.
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Federal Way, WA | Registered: August 20, 2004Reply With Quote
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